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Southern Indiana Corn has a Long Way to Go, Disease a Concern

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Purdue Extension Photo

It has been a rainy year in southern Indiana, and one agronomist based there says the entire area is now anywhere between 40 and almost 60 inches of rain for the first 8 months of the year.

“That’s pretty remarkable when our average yearly rainfall is about 46,� says DEKALB/Asgrow technical agronomist Matt Parmer. “But we’ve continued to get rains and temperatures have not been really hot this summer, so we’ve got a long way to go. The earliest planting dates we’ve got, May 15th, that stuff won’t really hit black layer until mid-September, so we’re going to push a lot of this crop off until late September, early October black layer dates. So, it’s really to early to start estimating where our grain depth is going to end up.�

Parmer says even with the challenging spring, if nice rain events and moderate temperatures continue the crops will end up better than anticipated. But, standability is a concern going into harvest.

“It is and probably our number one disease this year is Physoderma, and we’re already seeing that Physoderma, which typically is just a leaf blight on the sheath and often times just cosmetic has gotten into the nodes. We’re starting to see that ring of death.�

Parmer says affected fields are just a few big windstorms away from seeing node breakage that could be significant.

The post Southern Indiana Corn has a Long Way to Go, Disease a Concern appeared first on Hoosier Ag Today.

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