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Salad shortage because of California rains

Over the last several years, California farmers have been plagued by drought.

However, the problem in 2017 is too much rain, which may be putting a squeeze on the nation’s salad supplies.

A Bloomberg report says it may take until sometime in May before the nation’s grocery store shelves are fully stocked with salads again.

Unusually warm weather meant an early end to the winter growing season in southern California and western Arizona.

The warm weather was followed by unusually heavy rains that pushed back planting dates along the coastal areas of California, which is the largest fruit and vegetable producer in the country. T

he delays have led to shortfalls of crops like lettuce and broccoli, sending wholesale prices much higher. For example, the cost of a carton of 30 celery heads has almost tripled to $25.

A senior produce analyst with Rabobank in Fresno, California, says prices may remain volatile and “relatively elevated” through mid-May.

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