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ASA VP Doyle: Ag’s concerns are America’s concerns

Photo courtesy of the American Soybean Association (ASA)

America’s farmers are concerned about a whole host of different issues: Infrastructure, taxes, biofuels, the environment, and more. All these issues are not only vital to the future of the American family farm, but they are vital to the future of America as a global player in the marketplace, and the world we are planning to leave to our next generation.

AUDIO: Full interview with ASA VP Brad Doyle

ASA Vice President Brad Doyle is an Arkansas soybean farmer. He visited our booth at the Farm Progress Show in Decatur, Illinois. The first question I asked is what he was hearing from farmers and the marketplace.

Infrastructure is the hot topic issue right now. The Senate passed a bipartisan plan, and the House has started talking about their “Build Back Better” plan. Doyle says that no matter what is debated in the halls of Congress, infrastructure is a major need that cannot wait anymore. He reminds us of the issues on the Mississippi, which is one of our main corridors. Upkeep in that shipping system alone is vital to our export capabilities. Not to mention rail to the Pacific Northwest, and our roads and bridges.

Doyle also talks about the need to make sure biofuels are included in any infrastructure plan. We did just receive word that language has been added to invest $1 billion in biofuels infrastructure. Doyle talks about where this kind of investment can be an immediate benefit.

Doyle says that producers are understandably concerned about the stepped-up basis and estate tax proposals. Doyle says farmers need to get the story out about how this will impact their future. He says that many in the general public don’t understand the devastation this can cause small farms.

Doyle talks about what farmers can do to help get that message out to the public. The biggest step is to just get involved. The future is ours to save, but it is also ours to lose.

You can learn more about the American Soybean Association by visiting their website.

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